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(Source: ratqueens, via monadicmeg)

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perspicious:


WHAT YOU SHOULD DO:    Stay with us and keep calm.The last thing we need when we’re panicking, is to have someone else panicking with us.
Offer medicine if we usually take it during an attack.You might have to ask whether or not we take medicine- heck, some might not; but please, ask. It really helps.
Move us to a quiet place.We need time to think, to breathe. Being surrounded by people isn’t going to help.
Don’t make assumptions about what we need. Ask.We’ll tell you what we need. Sometimes; you may have to ask- but never assume.
Speak to us in short, simple sentences.
Be predictable. Avoid surprises.
Help slow our breathing by breathing us or by counting slowly to 10.As odd as it sounds, it works.


                                                                                                                 


WHAT YOU SHOULDN’T DO:1. Say, “You have nothing to be panicked about.”We know. We know. We know. And because we know we have nothing to be panicked about, we panic even more. When I realize that my anxiety is unfounded, I panic even more because then I feel like I’m not in touch with reality. It’s unsettling. Scary.Most of the time, a panic attack is irrational. Sometimes they stem from circumstances — a certain couch triggers a bad memory or being on an airplane makes you claustrophobic or a break up causes you to flip your lid — but mostly, the reasons I’m panicking are complex, hard to articulate or simply, unknown. I could tell myself all day that I have no reason to be having a panic attack and I would still be panicking. Sometimes, because I’m a perfectionist, I become even more overwhelmed when I think my behaviour is “unacceptable” (as I often believe it is when I’m panicking). I know it’s all in my mind, but my mind can be a pretty dark and scary place when it gets going.Alternate suggestion: Say, “I understand you’re upset. It is okay. You have a right to be upset and I am here to help.”2. Say, “Calm down.”This reminds me of a MadTV sketch where Bob Newhart plays a therapist who tells his patients to simply “Stop it!” whenever they express anxiety or fear. As a sketch, it’s funny. In real life, it’s one of the worst things you can do to someone having a panic attack. When someone tells me to “stop panicking” or to “calm down,” I just think, “Oh, okay. I haven’t tried that one. Hold on, let me get out a pen and paper and jot that down, you jerk.”Instead of taking action so that they do relax, simply telling a panicking person to “calm down” or “stop it” does nothing. No-thing.Alternate suggestion: The best thing to do is to listen and support. In order to calm them down without the generalities, counting helps.3. Say, “I’m just going to leave you alone for a minute.”Being left alone while panicking makes my heart race even harder. The last thing I want is to be left by myself with my troubled brain. Many of my panic attacks spark from over-thinking and it’s helpful to have another person with me, not only for medical reasons (in case I pass out or need water) but also it’s helpful to have another person around to force me to think about something other than the noise in my head.Alternate suggestion: It sometimes helps me if the person I’m with distracts me by telling me a story or sings to me. I need to get out of my own head and think about something other than my own panic.4. Say, “You’re overreacting.”Here’s the thing: I’m not. Panic attacks might be in my head, but I’m in actual physical pain. If you’d cut open your leg, no one would be telling you you’re overreacting. It’s a common trope in mental health to diminish the feelings or experience of someone suffering from anxiety or panic because there’s no visible physical ailment and because there’s no discernible reason for the person to be having such a strong fear reaction.The worst thing you can tell someone who is panicking is that they are overreacting.Alternate suggestion: Treat a panic attack like any other medical emergency. Listen to what the person is telling you. Get them water if they need it. It helps me if someone rubs my back a little. If you’re in over your head, don’t hesitate to call 911 (or whatever the emergency services number is where you are). But please, take the person seriously. Mental health deserves the same respect as physical health.



CREDIT [X]  [X]

perspicious:

WHAT YOU SHOULD DO:
    
  1. Stay with us and keep calm.
    The last thing we need when we’re panicking, is to have someone else panicking with us.

  2. Offer medicine if we usually take it during an attack.
    You might have to ask whether or not we take medicine- heck, some might not; but please, ask. It really helps.

  3. Move us to a quiet place.
    We need time to think, to breathe. Being surrounded by people isn’t going to help.

  4. Don’t make assumptions about what we need. Ask.
    We’ll tell you what we need. Sometimes; you may have to ask- but never assume.

  5. Speak to us in short, simple sentences.

  6. Be predictable. Avoid surprises.

  7. Help slow our breathing by breathing us or by counting slowly to 10.
    As odd as it sounds, it works.
                                                                                                                 
WHAT YOU SHOULDN’T DO:

1. Say, “You have nothing to be panicked about.”
We know. We know. We know. And because we know we have nothing to be panicked about, we panic even more. When I realize that my anxiety is unfounded, I panic even more because then I feel like I’m not in touch with reality. It’s unsettling. Scary.

Most of the time, a panic attack is irrational. Sometimes they stem from circumstances — a certain couch triggers a bad memory or being on an airplane makes you claustrophobic or a break up causes you to flip your lid — but mostly, the reasons I’m panicking are complex, hard to articulate or simply, unknown. I could tell myself all day that I have no reason to be having a panic attack and I would still be panicking. Sometimes, because I’m a perfectionist, I become even more overwhelmed when I think my behaviour is “unacceptable” (as I often believe it is when I’m panicking). I know it’s all in my mind, but my mind can be a pretty dark and scary place when it gets going.

Alternate suggestion: Say, “I understand you’re upset. It is okay. You have a right to be upset and I am here to help.”


2. Say, “Calm down.”
This reminds me of a MadTV sketch where Bob Newhart plays a therapist who tells his patients to simply “Stop it!” whenever they express anxiety or fear. As a sketch, it’s funny. In real life, it’s one of the worst things you can do to someone having a panic attack. When someone tells me to “stop panicking” or to “calm down,” I just think, “Oh, okay. I haven’t tried that one. Hold on, let me get out a pen and paper and jot that down, you jerk.

Instead of taking action so that they do relax, simply telling a panicking person to “calm down” or “stop it” does nothing. No-thing.

Alternate suggestion: The best thing to do is to listen and support. In order to calm them down without the generalities, counting helps.


3. Say, “I’m just going to leave you alone for a minute.”
Being left alone while panicking makes my heart race even harder. The last thing I want is to be left by myself with my troubled brain. Many of my panic attacks spark from over-thinking and it’s helpful to have another person with me, not only for medical reasons (in case I pass out or need water) but also it’s helpful to have another person around to force me to think about something other than the noise in my head.

Alternate suggestion: It sometimes helps me if the person I’m with distracts me by telling me a story or sings to me. I need to get out of my own head and think about something other than my own panic.


4. Say, “You’re overreacting.”
Here’s the thing: I’m not. Panic attacks might be in my head, but I’m in actual physical pain. If you’d cut open your leg, no one would be telling you you’re overreacting. It’s a common trope in mental health to diminish the feelings or experience of someone suffering from anxiety or panic because there’s no visible physical ailment and because there’s no discernible reason for the person to be having such a strong fear reaction.

The worst thing you can tell someone who is panicking is that they are overreacting.

Alternate suggestion: Treat a panic attack like any other medical emergency. Listen to what the person is telling you. Get them water if they need it. It helps me if someone rubs my back a little. If you’re in over your head, don’t hesitate to call 911 (or whatever the emergency services number is where you are). But please, take the person seriously. Mental health deserves the same respect as physical health.


CREDIT [X]  [X]

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Major Powers from World of Thedas

(Source: the-disenchanted, via inquisitors-keep)

Tags: DA
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swanjolras:

like tbh i feel like my problem with the “dark and gritty!!” trend in modern stories is this

there’s this idea in our culture that cynicism is realistic? that only children believe in happy endings, that people are ultimately selfish and greedy and seeing with clear eyes means seeing the world as…

Tags: positive
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lemonbubble:

Let’s talk about art style, colour theory and symbolism in Transistor! Yay!

First of all, I’m not well versed in these particular art styles, so I could be talking nonsense for all I know.

Secondly: Probably mildly spoilery! Read at your own risk. And now on with the overanalysisng of video games!

So I noticed a couple of days ago that there’s a distinct stylistic division in Transistor. Specifically between Red and the Camerata, they are represented by different art styles. Red’s motif is all Art Nouveau, most obviously in the posters advertising her show, which is a style all about organic shapes and reflecting nature. It shows that she’s a very organic person, all about feelings and life. She’s the life of the game and the life of Cloudbank. Remember how deeply her music affected people? It made them think, and it made them riot. Red is all about life and emotions. The colours that represent her are red, of course, and gold, both of which are very warm, rich, life-filled colours.

In contrast, the Camerata’s motifs seem to draw inspiration from Art Deco, which is fitting since it was kind of competing with art nouveau when they were popular. Art Deco is all hard lines, geometric shapes, very stiff and calculated. I think this reflects the Camerata pretty well, in particular Royce, who came to see the world as a series of numbers and equations, and Grant, who was tired of the endless, predictable cycles the city went through.

In addition to that, the colours of the Camerata are red and white. The red I think shows that they are people too, they’re only doing what they think is best. But the white is in contrast to Red’s gold. It’s a cold, clean, clinical sort of colour. Combined with the straight sharp lines of the Camerata’s outfits and symbols, it shows that they are more cut off from the people of the city. Red is directly connected to the people and she does what’s best for them just by being herself. The Camerata were all higher up admins for a long time, so they could easily become disconnected from knowing what the people really wanted.

I think the white also reflects how the Camerata wanted everything to stay the same. Something about white says “unchanging” to me.

Also, looking at the possible symbolism of the colours, it’s interesting to see how the outfits of individual Camerata members shows their personalities. They all wear red, black and white. Grant, who truly wants to do what’s best for the people, wears mostly red. Royce, the most calculating and aloof, wears mostly white.

Sybil is an interesting exception in two ways. Firstly, she wears a flowing dress, which is more in line with Red’s stylistic motifs than the Camerata’s. This makes sense since she was the one out there getting close to people. She was, in a way, the life of the Camerata. The other thing different about her is that she wears hints of gold, around her neckline and belt. Gold is Red’s colour. Sybil had a massive gay crush on Red. [waggles eyebrows]

I also think it’s really cool how the game has this whole sort of cyber noir thing going on and the two big art motifs are from the 1920s-40s when noir was really popular.

Ok, I’m done.

Oh wait, one more thing. I have no idea what it could mean, but you also see a lot of the art nouveau thing going on inside the Spine.

(via emptiest-set)

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redheadedrevolutionary:

acrusadeagainststupid:

transistor is 33% off on steam today

and i am buying it because redheadedrevolutionary is amazing

I HAVE SUCCEEDED

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misspiggy385:

@dragonage: Do you think Brother Genitivi would approve of this massive #DAI guide from @primagames? http://t.co/FPylivdMVC
(X) SOURCE

misspiggy385:

@dragonage: Do you think Brother Genitivi would approve of this massive #DAI guide from @primagames? http://t.co/FPylivdMVC

(X) SOURCE

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Pikachu hot cakes! 

(Source: pastabaek, via gg-time)

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krystal-cage:

i take what i do very seriously

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Inner Scout Symbols in Moon Pride (x)

(Source: melonatics, via eternal-sailormoon)